social media

Filming Real Life: 2

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Instagram has totally sky rocketed over the past few years and is getting bigger than ever. Being the home of the ultimate hashtagging behaviour Instagram plays the main part in development my collage of real life and online life overlapping. Here are the drawings that I created for the after effects graphic included in the video. These graphics were used for the end of the Instagram in real life video to reveal the purpose of the video and how it shows the process of taking a picture in real life and uploading it to the online world. The study of Instagram pictures and The hash tag culture that has developed is interesting because for an app which is meant to be all about the image has now become all about the words, which is why the video ends with all the hashtags and the overlapping of voices and blacks out. From my “indirect observations” (Wilson 2002), I was able to see that people were using the word “hashtag” in day to day conversation. This is actually one of the social media addiction signs . It seems so bizarre that people have different views about everything and feel the need to share it but realistically everyone has one view and that is that they want to be viewed by others….

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Life through the eyes of your Mobile Internet device…

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Are we truly enjoying the moment if our main concern is getting a picture for our Instagram, checking in on Facebook or Tweeting about how much we are having a great time?   

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This image is great at reflecting how social media and real life are overlapping… We are watching events that meant to be felt as well as listening to and seen, however if were too engrossed in our internet devices then are we actually living real life to its full potential? Are Camera Phones Making Memories Or Ruining Gigs? The article Should mobile phones be banned from gigs? sums up how they are effecting human interaction for the negative and whether it would be better to put a stop to it. When looking at these images – I don’t know about you but I just want to scream “PUT YOUR PHONE DOWN AND JUST ENJOY IT!”. Plus theres nothing worse when someone in front of you has their phone out and blocks your view!!

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Pinning the concept down

1. What is the idea?

The Hash tag Life – Social Media meets Real World

A combination of interactive media artefacts, representing a conceptual study of social media usage, offering an insightful perspective on how it is impacting society

1. Glamourisation of lifestyle. The need to share everything, and the need to make like look better than it is.

2. Privacy – be careful what you share. Emotional attachment to social media profile, how audiences feel when they know someone is viewing their profile, selective viewing of our profiles – you wouldn’t say it in person so why say it online.

3. Online virtual reality in reality. What if we could see the conversations in real time in real life that people were having via technological devices?

2. Keywords

Social media audiences, story, reality, virtual reality, privacy, realism, visualisation, SM culture, art, digital art, technologies

3. What is innovative about my idea?

People do not tend to address the issues I wish to raise, and so with a fine art take on modern digital media, my project will exhibit the observations of social media audiences that will highlight just how connect we are becoming and the potential issues raised due to this.

4. Description of Audience

Heavy social media users, i.e. those with multiple social network accounts, regular up loaders, those interested in Internet usage and future technologies.

Bournemouth University Students at Talbot Campus – the visualisation will tell their story more specifically, however the overall concept will be applicable to general social media users.

5. Description of the cultural and industrial context and purpose of this project

Combining theory, knowledge and understanding of a given concept and audience, this project demonstrates my ability to observe a target audience, offer creative analysis, as well as interesting insight via stimulating content that will express imagination, innovation and exploration of a given media artefact that is social media culture.

There is continued debate about society’s increasing dependence on the internet as a whole and more specifically portable internet devices and social media networks. This project will demonstrate how the behaviour people have online is actually quite bizarre when contrasted within the real world space. This will highlight why having conversation with people in person and communicating via face to face communication systems still hold a high level of importance. It will accentuate that although we are all buried within our phones, tablets or laptops, participating in an online world and perhaps bypassing the real world – the real world is what we should appreciate and participate within. It will be eye opening in terms of audiences reflecting on their own usage and own time wasted/spent online. The idea of the “outside looking in” is relevant when imagine what I wish to portray and bringing about a physically visualisation of what actually goes on online and the emotional attachment that comes with this.

6. The technologies I will use are…

Portfolio Website – HTML5, PHP, CSS, JQUERY

Website content – Image, video, sound, developed using Photoshop, After Effects, information gathered via the Internet.

Exhibition – Projection of website content on larger scale, Installation, print materials

Social Media and Life Glamourisation

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There has been a constant debate about how super models are photoshopped for magazines and photographs, giving an unrealistic and idealistic image of what people should look like. Essentially this is basically what social media has allowed everyone, not just super models or industry professionals, to do – to glamourise their own lives by posted about it online and using image filter options. The images above have been taken from different media resources, some socila media and some from traditionalistic news broadcasters and demonstrates the contrast between what is actually real life and what is depicted in online life. Obviously the images are just a demonstration, and were taken at different times etc so would appear different. But if a larger scale collection of media at one given time were to be collected, this could give a really interesting outlook in how social media is glamourising lifestyles.

Additionally, by recording this level of online activity around one given physical space, it will demonstrate how “conversation” online is happening all the time and a given space is no longer what it seems or used to be seen as. This links back to the idea of story and trans media story – the story is already being generated organically through social media and it is my task to collect it and demonstrate how is it effecting everyday life.

The demonstration clip has been creating using the video creating functionality on photoshop. This was simple and easy to use however I fear that with large quantities of images and information it will be very slow and glitchy to work with. I think using a more video based software such as Adobe After Effect or Final Cut Pro would be better.

 

Identity Theory and Social Media Participation

Identity Theory in regards to Social Media participation:

Individuals employ a social identity online…. Tajfel (1981) combines   “four linked concepts: social categorisation, social identity, social comparison and psychological group distinction” to construct better understanding of self-identity.

The social categorisation process is the “bringing together social objects or events in groups which are equivalent with regard to an individual’s actions, intentions and system beliefs” (Tajfel 1981, p.254). So this means that for a transmedia story to work, it needs to “bring together social objects or event in a group” in order to make it desirable by a large audience.

Leary and Tangney (2005) explain how social identity is when the representation of the self is recognised as part of a social group, suggesting that social media users construct an appropriate ‘self’ to portray themselves online.

Ashmore et al. (2001) highlights the complexity of self and identity concepts, offering a further breakdown of social identity as the belief of group belonging, in which receiving acceptance from other group members is deemed an important facilitator of successful group membership. In terms of social media, this could be represented by the number of Facebook ‘friends’ or Twitter ‘followers’.

Leary and Tangney (2005)  states how social identities are “not simply individual cognitive constructions” (p.480), instead they are developed with shared attributes and beliefs of other individuals in mind.

Tajfel (1981) includes a relevant description of ‘social actions’, which play in construction of the social self.

The social comparison concept offers explanation linking social identity theory with social categorisation (Tajfel 1981). Leon Festinger (1954) concludes that social comparison is the drive humans have to evaluate their own opinions and abilities, by measuring them against the opinions and abilities of others who make theirs available. Social media facilitates communication between one to one, and one to many, allowing for social comparison to take place. The active users, are either consciously or unconsciously offering information about themselves to other users, hence making social comparison in an online space possible.

The social comparison theory offers insight  into social media networks “as a system of orientation which creates and defines the individual’s own place in society” (Tajfel 1981, p.258). Users are able to participate online and  in order to construct themselves socially and personally.

Social identity is very complex and social groups cannot necessarily be defined fundamentally. Psychological group distinction discusses how social attitudes; intentions and actions can be used to express the characteristics of a particular group (Tajfel 1981). The benefits, opportunities and other “consequences of membership” within a group can only achieve true satisfaction and status if defined in relation to an alternative group because “groups are…capable of any definition because of their insertions into a multi-group structure” (Tajfel 1981, p.259).

Ashmore, R.D., Ussim, L.J., Wilder, D., 2001. Social Identity, Intergroup Conflict and Conflict Reduction. London: Oxford University Press

Leary, M., Tangney, J., 2003. Handbook of Self and Identity.  NY: The Guildford Press

Tajfel, H., 1981, Human Groups and Social Categories: Studies in Social Psychology.  Cambridge USA: The Cambridge University Press

Online Character Development: Twitter Users

Types of Twitter User

1. The Egg. Every user starts Twitter life as an egg but many of those Twitter Eggs never hatch. Studies have shown that a quarter of Twitter users have never Tweeted. Some eggs may send a few tweets but then give it up and go quiet when they receive no responses

2. The Lurker. Studies have shown that 40% of uses logged in during a given month but did not tweet during this time. There is an overlap of eggs and lurkers, but lurkers tend to be active users just consuming news through the twitter feed without actively tweeting

3. Contester. Users who only really use there profile for the sole purpose of entering competitions or running promotions

4. Retweeter. Less confident Twitter users who only share other peoples posts. They may feel a bit daunted by the whole concept and struggle to let their true personality shine through

5. Bot. The non human twitter account posting automated tweets

6. #TeamFollowBack. Those wishing to embark upon world domination by having a most ridiculous amount of followers. Tweets include too many hashtags, particular ones encouraging a follow or a retweet. High number of followers and high number of followees.

7. Celebrity. Celebrities can include musicians, athletes, actors, the prime minister… anybody known by the masses. Celebrities have millions of followers and with have anything they post retweeted hundreds of times so they can use this influence to do good or purely for self promotion

8. Social Star/”Guru”. Those who have amassed a serious following on twitter and become pseudo celebrities online. Provide a string of content.

9. Business. Advertisers engaging with the world in a way not possibly before social media

10. The steady eddie’s. Core user base of Twitter. Some tweet, some don’t, but they are generally engaged and are essential to the success of twitter as they act as the main audience that advertisers are going to reach with their promoted tweets. Usually very socially engaging on a regular bases with all types of users.

 

 

http://socialmediatoday.com/minterdial/1781106/who-follow-twitter-cartography-types-twitter-profiles-and-users